Storify: Does your job make you want to get up in the morning?

Greetings!

My last post for COMM 2F00 is the Storify assignment. For the first ever attempt utilizing the media of Storify, I was quite surprised by the ease in which I was able to complete my story. I enjoyed using this tool and will continue to search for ways it could be applied in my work world.

The subject I chose to write about is how leadership can fail to engage employees in the workplace and what are some simple steps a leader can take to engage and excite employees. My recent experience with poor leadership was the catalyst for choosing this topic. The results of a restructuring indicated it must have been a shell game exercise with the only goal being to fill ‘seats’. It left a lot of people shaking their heads wondering ‘what were they thinking?’.

The link below will take you to my Storify article on Leadership Engaging Employees. (Click on the title of the article.)

I hope you enjoy!

Link: Does Your Job Make You Want to Get up in the Morning?

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Module 6 Summative Post. Citizen Journalism in action: Quebec De-Railment in Online News

This week we reflected on how social media presents opportunities for us to become citizen journalists and involved in online activism. The comments I received both echoed and cautioned the sentiment I had expressed in my blot post; that social media platforms provide easy access encouraging citizens to become more active online however credibility can be questioned. I further suggested that this active participation will heighten interest and awareness of global events hence broadening knowledge. Alenasaric commented “I definitely agree that active participation will heighten. Furthermore, social media and its opportunities are still in the early stage.”
Little Fish commented that “New social network technology not only brings freedom to citizen journalism, but also mixes with unreliable information. Sometimes the news that appears on Twitter just makes us hard to believe.” This was more evident to me today than ever before.

As I sat down to write this summative blog, I was amazed to see the massive reach of online citizen journalism and how Twitter activity jumps when breaking news occurs. I went to CBC News website to read about the devastation caused by the oil cars derailing in Quebec. There it was, an article entitled:

“Social media fills official information gap in Lac-Megantic disaster”! – by Tanya Birkbeck, July 8, 2013, 2:48pm
The CBC News website and its “Your Community Blog” carried the following information:
“People desperate to know the whereabouts of friends and family have flocked to social media, but it’s been hard to know what is fact and what is hearsay. But citizen-initiated sites quickly became more popular than official sources.”
“By Sunday, journalists such as the Globe and Mail’s Les Perreaux, were sharing this link — with some reservations. “Remember when I said the information vacuum left by the SQ would be filled? Can’t vouch for authenticity of this. supportlacmegantic.com/index.php”

This was a perfect example of how the social media platform “Twitter further extends the potential participant base for citizen commentary. No one individual Twitter user is responsible for compiling, collating, and curating the available information on any given topic. Instead, it becomes a thoroughly collaborative exercise.” (Bruns, Highfield, 2012, p10-11) “Twitter effect allows you to provide live coverage without any reporters on the ground, by simply newsgathering user-generated content available online” (Hermida, 2012 p663)
The learning I had with this module really came to life with this social media breaking news interaction. How absolutely cool it was to see and experience! My sympathies to the loss being experienced by the families of Lac Megantic.

Module 6 Post: Citizen Journalism

With technological advances of social media there are new opportunities for citizen journalism and social activism. The accessibility and ease of technology allows citizens to participate as much or as little as they desire. Although this is the case today it was not always this way as evidenced in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists article where an analysis was performed on how traditional and new media covered three nuclear accidents. During the 1979 Three Mile Island journalism coverage reporters “had to scramble for phone access, standing in lines at telephone booths or paying local residents to use telephones to report back to editors or news directors.” (Friedman, 2011, p57) Radiation reporting was incomplete as “reporters did not know enough to ask the right questions” and the “language gap among the engineers, government officials and journalists.” (Friedman, 2011, p58) Fast forward to 2011 and the Japan Fukushima nuclear disaster and we see a completely different style of journalism occurring. Social media gave readers “links to and updates from other web and social media resources; readers’ comments were posted online, giving feedback to journalists and enabling dialogues that included opinions, answers to questions, and suggestions for other website s to view.” (Friedman, 2011, p60) The social media facilitated expert input to address knowledge gaps. The ease of technology permitted visuals that the average consumer could comprehend. The new citizen journalist created a win-win situation where news producers and consumers were satisfied.
The social media platform “Twitter further extends the potential participant base for citizen commentary. No one individual Twitter user is responsible for compiling, collating, and curating the available information on any given topic. Instead, it becomes a thoroughly collaborative exercise.” (Bruns, Highfield, 2012, p10-11) “Twitter effect allows you to provide live coverage without any reporters on the ground, by simply newsgathering user-generated content available online” (Hermida, 2012 p663) this was clearly evident in the Fukushima incident. Furthermore, when Bruns and Highfield carried out an analysis to identify the quantity of activity during breaking-news it identified that tweets and re-tweets increased 60% from normal usage. This statistic remained “constant regardless of the total number of unique Twitter users contributing to each hash tag”. (Bruns, Highfield, 2012,p19) The downside to utilizing Twitter and other social media is the effect on “newspapers in that they are downsizing and consequently buying out or laying off many specialty reporters.” (Freidman, 2011, p63)
So yes, opportunity abounds as citizens can actively participate in news discussions. “Journalism is evolving into a tentative and iterative process where contested accounts are examined and evaluated in public in real-time.” (Hermida,2012, p1) I suggest that this active participation will heighten interest and awareness of global events hence broadening knowledge. I finish by pointing you in the direction of Egypt and the now ousted leader Mohamed Morsi to see active citizen journalism in practice.


References:

Bruns, A. & T. Highfield. (2012). Blogs, Twitter, and breaking news: The produsage of citizen journalism. pre-publication draft on personal site [Snurb.info]. Published in: Lind, R. A. ed. (2012). Produsing Theory in a Digital World: The Intersection of Audiences and Production. New York: Peter Lang. p15-32.

Hermida, A. (2012). TWEETS AND TRUTH: Journalism as a discipline of collaborative verification. Journalism Practice. 6:5-6, p659-668.

Friedman, S. M. (2011). Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima: An analysis of traditional and new media coverage of nuclear accidents and radiation. Bulletin Of The Atomic Scientists, 67(5), 55-65.

Module 5 Podcast: Six Reasons Your Best Employees Quit You

This week I did my first ever podcast and was absolutely amazed at how smoothly it went! My blog is focused on ‘Leading to Engage Employees’ hence I focused the podcast on an article called “Six Reasons Your Best Employees Quit You” by Louis Efron, contributor to Forbes e-zine.

Module 5 Podcast: Six Reasons Good Employees Quit You

Module 5 Summary

What I found most thought provoking and interesting for this module blog was the insight into Chinese activities with respect to piracy.  One of my fellow bloggers is from China and spoke in his blog and response to my blog about the piracy activity in his homeland.  LittleFish identified with the article “Cultures of music piracy: An ethnographic comparison of the US and Japan”.  Specifically he spoke of the Japanese anime which “As a fan of Japanese anime I didn’t pay for watch them after I was 10.  It is the benefit that new technology brought to us.”  The Japanese “anime world provided the example of taking a lenient attitude towards copyright.” ( Condry, 2004,p354)  and that was to post online anime episodes as soon as they were broadcast.  LittleFish agreed with that approach “Like you said ‘get the most possible stuff for the least possible money.  That’s kind of common sense for everybody.  If we can watch Japanese anime on a free website, then no one will bother to think about the copyright.”

Alenasaric articulated what we all know but really haven’t stated “There are no rules, laws or regulations that one can impose to eliminate this technology.”  Basically, we shouldn’t waste time debating how destructive technology is; “embrace this new technology and develop new alternative compensation systems.”    LittleFish concurred with that idea “We have to find a balance point that can satisfy side, the music producers and the consumers.” 

Alenasaric was completely aligned with me on “If you purchased the music, you should have a right to copy it to as many mp3 as you would like as long as it’s for personal use.”  What I did find very interesting was the final thoughts Alenasaric wrote in the response to my blog “I think in some ways the industry is trying to be too strict which is causing many people to revolt”.  I believe there is truth to that statement when you read the four motivations to pirate is “(1) to share culture/content, (2) to sample, (3) the inability to afford content and (4) to undermine the current copyright regime.”  (Steinmetz,Tunnell, 2013,p56) The honesty provided by my fellow student from China supports this research.

In conclusion, I found my blog post as well as all who commented were in agreement that the copyright issue is in need of an overhaul that is fair to both producer and consumer.

Module 5 Initial Blog: To share or not to share?

“Young people, using computers to download digitized intellectual property, are today’s pirates.”  (Steinmetz, Tunnell, 2013, p.53) While many of the pirates may be young people I would suggest a significant number of ‘older’ more seasoned computer pirates exist too!   To provide evidence for that statement I direct you to observe the clientele at a Best Buy or Future Shop on a Saturday!

Reading through “Under the Pixelated Jolly Roger:  A Study of On-Line Pirates” by Steinmetz and Tunnell I learned “four motivations for engaging in piracy… (1) to share culture/content, (2) to sample, (3) the inability to afford content and (4) to undermine the current copyright regime.” (Steinmetz,Tunnell, 2013,p.56) From the perspective of a typical university student, “Sampling is particularly important to young people…  Sampling allows them to make discretionary decisions on how they spend their limited funds.” (p.59). Now this makes sense to me!

In the article “Cultures of Music Piracy” by Ian Condry, I identified my family in the discussion referring to “sharing of music without exchange of money.”  (p345)  Not only us, but majority of people like to “get the most possible stuff for the least possible money.” (p348) I had never thought we were doing anything illegal when music is purchased, downloaded onto the family computer and then copied to a MP3 player.  Didn’t we buy the music? Aren’t we allowed to copy it onto our mobile devices?  This type of behaviour has brought about legal aspects such as the “Recording Industry Association of America initiated lawsuits against its own consumers.” (p343)  Is this having an impact on consumers?  “Are lawsuits changing file-sharers’ behaviour?” (p350)  A 2004 survey “estimated that the lawsuits convinced around 6 million former down-loaders to stop, but also estimated that 5 million new users started up in the same period (Rainie et al., 2004).” (p350)

An analysis of the Japanese anime and the concept of the “fansubs” should be performed.  The fansubs have allowed “some copyright infringement” but it has not “caused the ‘fall of the anime industry’.”  In fact, there is speculation it “may well have contributed to its world-wide popularity” (p355)

I absolutely agree that we should teach “‘respect for property’ while building a healthy music market in the digital age.” (p344) however it’s time to catch up with technology and “develop new alternative compensation systems” (p344).

 

Condry, Ian. (2004). Cultures of Music Piracy: An Ethnographic Comparison of the US and JapanInternational Journal of Cultural Studies. 7 (3), pg. 343-363

Steinmetz, K., K. Tunnell (2013). Under the Pixelated Jolly Roger: A Study of On-Line PiratesDeviant Behavior. 34 (1), pg. 53-67

Module 4 Short Video

A media remix/mash-up of ’employee engagement’.